French National School

September 8th, 2021 by nathan Leave a reply »

Classicism was formed as antagonistic direction with respect to lush and virtuosic baroque art. But when the second half of 17th century classicism became the official art of the absolutist monarchy, he has incorporated elements of the baroque. It manifested in the architecture of Versailles, in the work of the painter Charles Lebrun, F. Girardon sculpture, and A. Kuazevoksa. At the head of the direction of becoming the Paris Academy of Fine Arts, which is the creation of a set of artificial dogmatic rules and laws supposedly unshakable composition. Add to your understanding with Dr. B. This academy has also established principles of rationalist image of emotions ("passions") and the separation of genres at "high" and "low." By "high" Genres included historical, religious and mythological genres, to "lower" – portrait, landscape, genre, still life. Over time, this trend has degenerated into a cold formal academic.

In the mid-18th century against the background educational movement, on the eve of the French Revolution, a new direction Classicism art stand in opposition to the rococo and creativity imitators – academics. A feature of this trend was display features of realism, the desire for clarity and simplicity, the reflection of Enlightenment ideal of "natural humanity". > Sculpture of the Classical period is different severity and restraint, coherence of forms, calm posture, even when the movement does not violate the formal closure of (E. Falcone, Jean Houdon). The period of late Classicism – Empire – occurs in the first third of the 19th century. Different dressing and pomp, reflected in architecture and applied arts. This period is distinguished as an independent.

In the second half-century France – the most powerful absolutist power in Western Europe. This time of addition of the French National School of Fine Arts, the formation of the classic lines, whose homeland is considered to be France. French art in XVP. is based on the traditions of the French Renaissance.

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